Curriculum

Subject Leader : Cassie de Gilbert

Intent

In our fast-paced digital world, we recognise that more than ever every child must become a fluent, effective reader. We believe reading is the key to success, not only academically but also socially, across the curriculum. By the time children leave us, they will be competent readers who can recommend literature to their peers, have a thirst for reading a range of genres including poetry, and participate in discussions about literature, including evaluating an author’s use of language and the impact this can have on the reader. Literature chosen will reflect the diversity of the world around us so that our pupils develop as citizens of the world.

Our curriculum for Reading, based on the National Curriculum Programme of Study, aims to ensure that all children:

  • Develop competence in word reading and comprehension (both reading and listening).
  • Speedily work out the pronunciation of unfamiliar words and speedily recognise familiar printed words.
  • Have a good linguistic knowledge (of vocabulary and grammar) and knowledge of the world through reading widely.
  • Develop positive attitudes towards reading and understand what has been read.
  • Participate in discussions and debates about books and challenge views courteously.
  • Experience high-quality discussion with a teacher.
  • Read widely across a range of stories, poems and non-fiction texts.
  • Discuss and evaluate authorial choices.
  • Cultivate a sense of identity and understand the world in which they live.
  • Read fluently and confidently in all subjects.

Implementation 

Opportunities to develop reading skills and widen literacy experience is at the forefront of all subjects. We ensure it is at the forefront of curriculum design across all subjects and is implemented in the following ways:

  • Curriculum – The National Curriculum for Reading is covered by children taking part in at least 3 lessons of whole class Guided Reading a week. Within these lessons, children are exposed to a range of challenging literature (including those from different cultures) and will practise a range of comprehension skills so that they can demonstrate a deep level of understanding. Targeted pupils in Year 3 and 4 are provided with a bespoke phonics intervention based on ‘Letters and Sounds’.
  • Experiences – Each classroom has an engaging reading area with books matched to their reading age. The books available also expose pupils to different experiences and cultures. This is a welcoming space for children to share books throughout the day and encourages pupils to develop a love of reading. All children from Year 3 to Year 6 choose an age-appropriate reading book (at an appropriate level of challenge) to take home and this reading book is changed regularly. Rewards are offered to children who read regularly and widely. Parents and carers are encouraged to support reading at home and complete the reading diary. Further support and guidance for parents and carers is available on our school website.
  • Language – Through the selection of challenging, diverse literature, pupils are exposed to a wide range of vocabulary which they are encouraged to use in other areas of the curriculum. Teachers take every opportunity to promote the learning of new vocabulary.
  • Basic Skills – Within Guided Reading sessions, pupils have regular opportunities to develop their oracy skills through reading aloud, performing dramatic readings of excerpts of text and having discussions with their peers. Catch-up programmes, such as ‘Switch-On Reading’ and the use of literacy volunteers, support pupils who require additional interventions with Reading.
  • Link to school’s context – The diversity of the literature selected promotes respect for other cultures and the level of challenge encourages pupils to be determined in their efforts to become fluent and confident readers. Furthermore, our school library exposes pupils to a wide range of non-fiction texts which allow them to deepen understanding of the world.
  • Other – Each classroom also has a selection of non-fiction books (from the Education Library Service) which are directly linked with the class topic. This offers opportunities for the children to apply their reading skills across the curriculum. Every day, children and staff undertake ‘Drop Everything and Read’ time where they read for 15 minutes. This can be reading independently or having an aspirational story read to them by their class teacher. Throughout the year, there are opportunities to promote a love of reading through visits to our local library as well as themed activities such as ‘World Book Day’ and ‘Shakespeare Week’.

Subject Leader : Duncan Patchett

Intent

At The Carlton Junior Academy, we believe that the ability to write with confidence and accuracy is an essential life skill that provides a gateway to excellent communication.  We have a strong emphasis on developing our pupils’ ability to write across a range of genres, securing grammar, punctuation and spelling skills. Handwriting is taught throughout KS2 to enable children to develop a cursive style and to promote motor skills in order to increase fluency and speed. We aim to enable all pupils to reach their full potential as writers by practising and applying writing skills regularly across the curriculum, developing an awareness of the audience, purpose and context for writing. We aim to promote and develop an increasingly wide knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Our curriculum for Writing follows the National Curriculum and aims to ensure that all children:

  • Identify the audience and purpose for the writing.
  • Choose the appropriate text type for the purpose of writing, such as recount, report, persuasion, description or autobiographical.
  • Effectively communicate ideas and organise them coherently for the reader.
  • Develop competence in transcription and composition.
  • To plan, draft, evaluate and edit writing.
  • Secure accurate spelling by knowing the relationships between sounds and letters.
  • Develop fluent, legible and speedy handwriting.
  • Enhance their existing vocabulary.

Implementation

Curriculum- Teaching develops pupils’ skills in transcription (spelling and handwriting) and composition (articulating ideas and structuring them in speech and writing). In order to develop handwriting and to ensure progression in skills, we use the Letter-Join handwriting scheme in conjunction with the Carlton Infant Academy. We use high quality, carefully considered texts as immersive stimuli for writing. This approach allows children to put writing into context so they can see the link and purpose for it. We use a Rising Stars whole school spelling scheme as well as Spelling Shed to extend children’s understanding and to provide a full coverage of National Curriculum objectives. To teach and develop a deeper phonological understanding, we use the Letters and Sounds phonics programme.

Language – At school, children are exposed to a rich vocabulary that supports them to grow a wide knowledge and understanding of words and language. All classes incorporate Talk for Writing. This is a powerful approach that is based on the principles of how children learn. It enables children to imitate the language they need for a particular topic orally, before reading and analysing it, and then writing their own version. The use of drama, talk partners and role play gives children great opportunities to experiment with using new vocabulary. The children will learn the correct grammatical terms in English.

Mastery – Pupils are encouraged to take care and pride in their work and select the appropriate format in which they would like to present their learning. For example, this may be in the style of: a persuasive poster, a diary or a non-chronological report.

Experiences – We plan regular visits, visitors and curriculum enrichment activities to provide first-hand experiences for the pupils and to support and develop their learning. The children take part in regular Spelling Bees where participants engage in an exciting and challenging spelling competition in order to be crowned Spelling Champion. High expectations in handwriting are promoted by weekly Handwriting Hero certificates being awarded to one child in each class who demonstrates excellence.

Basic skills -Within Writing sessions, pupils have regular opportunities to discuss ideas and to build their knowledge of the writing process. They develop oracy skills through using a wide range of cross-curricular language and by participating in drama activities. Children are encouraged to always have pride in their work and to present all writing to a high standard.

Link to school’s context – Our school values are evident in all our Writing lessons due to the high level of challenge in all areas of English. Pupils are encouraged to show determination when developing handwriting, redrafting and improving work and in using a wider range of appropriate vocabulary. They are respectful of other learners and their ideas, they take responsibility of their learning and demonstrate excellence in their final pieces.

Click this link for the school’s handwriting scheme Letter-Join

Home Guide

Click this link for the Teacher Assessment Frameworks at the end of Year 6

Teacher Assessment Frameworks At The End Of Key Stage 2

 

 

Subject Leader : Sue Charlesworth

Intent

Our curriculum follows a mastery approach, which caters for the needs of all individuals. We incorporate sustained levels of challenge through varied and high quality activities, with a focus on fluency, reasoning and problem solving.

Our curriculum for Mathematics follows the National Curriculum Programme of Study and aims to ensure that children:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics through varied and frequent practice so they can solve increasingly complex problems over time.
  • reason mathematically.
  • solve a variety of problems by applying their mathematical skills and knowledge.
  • can break the problems down into a series of simpler steps and persevere in seeking solutions.

Pupils are required to explore Maths in depth, using accurate mathematical vocabulary to reason and explain their understanding. A wide range of mathematical resources are available and pupils are taught to explain their mathematical thinking in a concrete fashion, before establishing ways of pictorially and formally representing their understanding. They are taught to explain their choice of methods and develop their mathematical reasoning skills. We encourage resilience and acceptance that struggle is often a necessary step in learning. As our pupils progress, we intend for them to be able to understand the world and the important and useful part Maths plays in real life. In addition, we expect them to have the ability to apply their knowledge of Maths in a wide variety of experiences, and to develop a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – At The Carlton Junior Academy, pupils study Mathematics daily covering a broad and balanced curriculum including elements of number, calculation, geometry, measures and statistics. Due to the interconnected nature of Mathematics, we aim to teach in a cross-curricular manner where natural links can be made. We discretely teach the practical application of mathematical skills, focusing not only on the mathematical methods, but on mathematical vocabulary and use the Mastery strategy to broaden and deepen understanding.
  • Mastery – We aim for each pupil to be confident in each yearly objective and develop their ability to use this knowledge to have a greater depth understanding to solve varied fluency problems, as well as problem solving and reasoning questions. We follow the Maths No Problem! scheme and use a variety of other resources, such as White Rose, to ensure curriculum coverage and deepen pupils’ understanding and experiences of applying skills.
  • Language – Mathematical language is taught throughout a unit of work. All pupils have access to the vocabulary as it is displayed on the working wall, and in books/on tables.  The definition and application of the language is modelled continuously and there is a high expectation for pupils to use, model and apply the correct terminology in their verbal and written reasoning.
  • Experiences – Wherever possible, we link Mathematics to other areas of learning and real life situations. We want pupils to know that Mathematics is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. Pupils have the opportunities to attend Maths sessions and  events at the Trust secondary schools and take part in Mathematics competitions.
  • Basic skills –Pupils have regular opportunities to reason and problem solve, justify answers and develop oracy skills through using a wide range of language and discussing solutions with others. There is a focus on memorising basic facts such as number bonds, times tables, and fraction, decimal and percentage equivalents.
  • Link to school’s context – Our school values are embedded through the Maths curriculum. Pupils are encouraged to show determination when tackling problems, to be respectful of other learners and their ideas, to take responsibility for their learning, and to demonstrate excellence in their work.
  • Other – From the 2019/20 academic year onwards, schools in England will be required to administer an online Multiplication Tables Check (MTC) to Year 4 pupils. To support the children with their multiplication practice we use ‘Times Table Rock Stars’ as an online and fun learning platform, which also offers resources to be used in the classroom.

 

Useful Links

Here are some useful websites for your children to access at home:

BBC Bitesize Maths

Hexagon

Learn Your Tables

Who wants to be a mathionaire?

Moon Maths

Math Brain

https://ttrockstars.com/login

IXL

www.multiplication.com (This has lots of fun games based on multiplication as well as addition and subtraction)

www.ttrockstars.com (Your child’s login should be in their organisers. Don’t hesitate to contact us if there is a problem about this)

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/subjects/z826n39 (This is helpful guidance on all KS2 topics)

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/7-11-years/times-tables (Here are different times tables games for your child to try)

https://www.timestables.co.uk/ (A good step by step approach to improving times tables knowledge)

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/maths/ (Lots of Maths games based on all the different topics)

http://www.learnyourtables.co.uk/en/index2.htm (A hands on approach to learn tables)

https://www.mathsisfun.com/games/mathionaire-addition-quiz.html (Who wants to be a Mathionaire?)

https://www.funbrain.com/math-zone (There is a Selection of Maths games)

Calculations Policy

Please find our Calculations Policy available to download below:

Subject Leader : Annabel Simmons

Intent

At The Carlton Junior Academy, we provide a high-quality science education which provides foundations for our children to have a secure understanding of the world. Through building a body of key knowledge, language, skills and concepts, our children are encouraged to develop a sense of enthusiasm and inquisitiveness about Science. Through our profound curriculum, children are given the opportunity to develop and apply their knowledge, to enhance their thinking skills further and to become successful and confident independent learners. Children are taught to look for patterns in data, solve problems, predict, analyse and conclude through hands on investigations.  Ultimately, children use their skills to then make links and connections in the four key areas of scientific study: enquiry; physical processes; life processes; and materials and their properties. In so doing, they will develop their curiosity, awareness and independence. We include a range of learning experiences for our children, providing them with the opportunity to focus on an additional science topic within the National Curriculum and wow experiences. This can include external agencies, engaging assemblies and workshops that link into the additional science topic being taught.

Implementation

Enrichment and Engagement:

  • British Science Week – incorporating fun and unusual experiments for children to understand the impact of science on the world.
  • STEM Science Club: an engaging and hands-on club that allows pupils to further their understanding of Science.
  • Educational Visits to local places; Amazon Future Engineers and Museums.
  • Children looking after and growing vegetables in our well-known vegetable patch.

We aim to spark curiosity and encourage questioning so that pupils gain a strong understanding of the world around them and achieve specific skills of investigation, for today and for the future. Our lessons are carefully planned, embedding scientific enquiry skills within each topic studied. These topics are revisited and developed throughout their time at school, ensuring children have a secure understanding. When asked, our pupils explained their love for Science and the enjoyment they feel when completing a vast range of scientific activities and experiments.

Our model allows all pupils to develop and use a range of skills including observation, planning and investigation, as well as being encouraged to question the world around them and become independent learners in exploring possible answers for their scientific based questions. This supports effective communication of ideas and opinions. Scientific vocabulary is taught through focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions.

Here are some great websites to further your learning at home:

https://explorify.wellcome.ac.uk/

https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/

https://wildlifeact.com/about-wildlife-act/wildlife-tracking-and-monitoring/

https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub/index.

html https://www.brainpop.com/science/seeall/

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/

Subject Leader : Beth Hunter

Intent

We recognise that all pupils need to be highly skilled and competent in computing and online safety to achieve success in the digital world. The subject not only stands alone, but is also woven into the whole curriculum and is an integral part of all learning. Online Safety is part of the culture of safeguarding and is embedded in all we do. The children will explore the impact that technology has on health, well-being and lifestyle. Computing, in general, is a significant part of everyone’s daily life and children should be at the forefront of new technology, with a thirst for learning.  Computing within school can therefore provide a wealth of learning opportunities and transferrable skills explicitly within Computing lessons and across other curriculum subjects. Children will become equipped with a wide range of fundamental lifelong skills, knowledge and understanding to become digitally literate and participate fully in the modern world. We want our children to become creators of digital content rather than simply consumers of it, creating their own digital masterpieces. Children must be exposed to ‘Computational Thinking’ in order to provide them with the essential knowledge that will enable them to participate effectively and safely in the digital world beyond our gates. We also empower pupils to teach and support each other by using Online Safety Leaders and we give the children the opportunity to talk about and celebrate their work. We will continue to embrace our responsibility within the wider school community, supporting parents with Online Safety and computing skills.

Our curriculum for Computing is based on the Nottinghamshire Computing Framework 2014. The Curriculum Framework covers the National Curriculum objectives which are as follows:

  • To design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems and solving problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
  • To use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs and work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • To use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • To understand computer networks, including the internet, how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.
  • To use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content.
  • To select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.
  • To use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; and identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

These objectives are organised into three strands:

Communication, Finding Out and Computing. In addition to these three strands, there is a section on Online Safety. This is used alongside Education for a Connected World. Online Safety should not be seen as a separate strand but should be embedded in all aspects of the academy community.

Each of the three strands are further broken down into specific areas for all year groups. Different skills and concepts are taught to each year group. This offers a clear picture of how these skills and concepts progress in each area. This supports differentiation and the development of personalised learning.

Implementation

Curriculum – The Computing Curriculum is taught weekly in one hour lessons with a specialist Computing Teacher. It is taught as a discrete subject so that the pupils achieve high level skills in using ICT, which they can then apply across the curriculum. Teachers are continually embedding computing skills with the children when they use ICT to support learning in other subjects. Work is carried out in classrooms on mobile devices so that opportunities for learning are more flexible and immediate. The school has 30 laptops and 16 iPads for pupils to use.

Learning is recorded against learning objectives on our tracking system EazMag. This data is then used to identify strengths and weaknesses so that actions can be implemented to address them and continually drive forward attainment.

Language – The children will learn to use the correct vocabulary and terminology linked to Computing. They will use language linked to Computational Thinking so they can: break a problem into smaller parts; recognise and find patterns; and develop instructions to solve a problem. There will be opportunities to talk about their experiences and achievements.

Links to School Context –

Online Safety

At The Carlton Junior Academy, we have an up-to-date understanding of the risks that exist online for our pupils and tailor our teaching and support to the specific needs of our pupils. We also offer parents relevant advice and guidance when new risks arise.

Touch Typing

Children arrive at The Carlton Junior Academy with minimal keyboard skills. In Year 3/4 we address this by teaching touch typing skills. This is a life skill and will equip pupils with the confidence and skills to use keyboards throughout their lives.

Coding

At the Carlton Junior Academy, we are always trying to raise the aspirations of our pupils. Coding strengthens logical thinking and problem solving which are vital in many areas of life from science and engineering to medicine and law. The number of careers that require coding is set to increase dramatically in the future and there is already a shortage of good coders. If our pupils learn to code, then the digital world is theirs for the taking.

Values

Our values are embedded through teaching children to be empowered, build resilience and effect positive culture change online. We promote the development of safe and appropriate long term behaviours and give the children strategies for maintaining positive relationships in online communities. The children also explore the impact that technology has on health, well-being and lifestyle.

Try some of these links they are great fun for learning Programming.

https://scratch.mit.edu/

http://www.kodugamelab.com/

https://hourofcode.com/uk

https://www.gethopscotch.com/

http://www.lego.com/en-gb/mindstorms/games/fix-the-factory

Do you want to try and make a podcast? Try this free software.

https://www.audacityteam.org/download/

BBC Dance Mat is a great website if you want to improve your touch typing.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf2f9j6/articles/z3c6tfr

Subject Leader – Mr Schofield

Intent

Physical Education is an integral part of our inclusive and engaging curriculum. We believe that Physical Education plays a vital role in the development of the whole child and is vitally important to securing life-long well-being and health.  We regard it to be of equal importance, and complementary, to other subjects. Pupils develop the knowledge, skills and competence to excel in a broad range of sports and physical activities. We aim to deliver high-quality teaching and learning opportunities that will enable all pupils to achieve their personal best and grow a love for sport and an active lifestyle.

Pupils participate in competitive sport and show determination to pursue personal excellence, develop positive and respectful relationships and have a responsibility to display good sportsmanship. We aim for all children to be physically active for sustained periods of time and to be able to make informed decisions to lead healthy and active lives.

Swimming is an important life skill; we aspire for all children to leave primary school being able to swim at least 25 metres.

Our curriculum for PE is based on the National Curriculum and aims to ensure that all children:

  • Develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities.
  • Are physically active for sustained periods of time.
  • Engage in competitive sports and activities.
  • Ultimately, lead healthy and active lives.
  • Enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other.
  • Learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – The Physical Education National Curriculum is covered by at least two hours of PE lessons per week. Depending on the time of year, current block of study or weather, children will be able to complete their PE sessions in the school hall or outside on the playground or field.  Activities may also take place in the wider community, for example educational visits and use of local swimming pools.  We have strong links with local professional clubs, Gedling Primary School Sports Association and the local School Games Organiser.  We employ a PE specialist teacher and have a TA with a sporting specialism.
  • Half Term Cycle – Our curriculum is taught on a one year cycle with two different activity focus areas every half term. A sports coach will teach one focus area and the class teacher another.
  • Basic Skills – Within PE lessons, children are exposed to a variety of sporting experiences and will practise a range of skills including, but not limited to:
    • Physical skills (agility, control and coordination).
    • Physical development (increasing strength, flexibility and endurance).
    • Personal, mental and social skills (determination, co-operation, self-confidence, initiative and leadership).
    • Wider learning skills (listening, observing, collaboration, communication, and decision making).
    • Artistic aspects of human movement.
    • Competitive spirit and the desire to improve personal results.
  • Language – A language rich PE curriculum is essential to enhance a life-long pursuit of physical activity. Children need to be aware of terms surrounding their health, their body and learn the language skills to enable communication with others. They need to become more fluent with language surrounding the effect of exercise on the body but also be able to use language in a way that will enable them to work more effectively as part of a team.
  • Link to school’s context – We know that many of our children have limited access to out-of-school activities with sport and fitness. A small minority of children attend clubs outside of school, play for local sports teams or access swimming lessons.  We also know that many of our children have poor health and attendance.  Some of them have a limited diet which has a negative impact on growth and general well-being.  Therefore, our curriculum aims to promote healthy eating and a healthy lifestyle alongside the pursuit of physical activity.  We aim to educate pupils on the direct link between a good level of personal nutrition and success in school sport.  We also aim for children to understand the correlation between taking part in sport and positive mental health.
  • Inclusion – Our PE programme incorporates a variety of sports to ensure all children develop the confidence, respect and the appreciation of their own and others’ strengths and weaknesses. We provide opportunities for all children to engage in extra-curricular activities before, during and after school, in addition to competitive sporting events. This is an inclusive approach which endeavours to encourage not only physical development but also well-being. Adaptations are made to support those with additional needs to ensure inclusivity.
  • Other – Children that excel in PE lessons will be selected to take part in ‘Elite Sport Coaching’ sessions. This will enable these children to further master more refined techniques and compete in inter-school competitions to a high level.

Physical Education and Healthy Lifestyle Links:

NHS – http://www.nhs.uk/change4life/Pages/change-for-life.aspx

Change 4 Life – https://smarttools.change4life.co.uk/

Premier League Primary Stars – https://plprimarystars.com

School Games – https://www.yourschoolgames.com/

 Intent

The overarching aim of our Foreign Languages Curriculum is to stimulate and encourage pupils’ curiosity about language and culture, and develop their confidence and creativity in communicating effectively with others. Learning a new language broadens pupils’ knowledge of the world and supports key elements of their Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural development, helping to foster an understanding of and respect for cultural diversity. The curriculum also reinforces key listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, which can be applied in a variety of contexts and lay the foundations for future language learning.

The programme for Foreign Languages, based on the National Curriculum, is designed to teach the progressive acquisition and mastery of simple vocabulary and grammatical structures to ensure that by the end of Key Stage 2, all pupils:

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources.
  • speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation.
  • can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt.
  • discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in the language studied.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – Across Key Stage 2, all children have the opportunity to make substantial progress in one language, French, taught by a subject specialist. Additional discrete practice activities are delivered through the week by the class teacher, with support from the subject leader. Where possible – and particularly in Years 5 and 6 – lesson content is taught in the target language. The Carlton Junior Academy benefits from the support of colleagues at The Carlton Academy and also offers a weekly French club.

The curriculum promotes a love of language through a wide range of engaging and enjoyable learning opportunities, including: rhymes, poems and songs; stories, role play and drama; games and ICT; and the use of high-quality, authentic and contemporary French resources. New vocabulary is further embedded through whole-school and classroom displays.

  • Basic skills – The core strands of the Foreign Languages Curriculum, Oracy, Literacy and Intercultural Understanding, are underpinned by the teaching of Knowledge About Language and Language Learning Strategies. These are transferable skills which are especially valuable in consolidating pupils’ understanding of English.

The curriculum offers pupils many opportunities to:

  • engage in conversations, asking and answering questions.
  • express opinions and respond respectfully to those of others.
  • read aloud or present information orally.
  • develop accurate pronunciation and intonation.
  • recognise and recall patterns and sounds in vocabulary.

In addition, learning a new language reinforces key aspects of personal development and citizenship education. Pupils develop their independence and confidence in: building relationships and communication; reflecting on their own lives and communities; considering the experiences, values and customs of others; and learning how to recognise and challenge stereotypes.

  • Links to school’s context – Our school community now comprises a variety of different languages and countries of origin, and the Foreign Languages curriculum supports our whole school values, in particular, promoting respect and positive relationships. It seeks to improve all pupils’ cultural capital through their experience, understanding and appreciation of the world around them. Furthermore, the Foreign Languages curriculum supports our pupils in developing essential listening and oracy skills, such as the ability to memorise and recall key words/phrases; to articulate ideas clearly and fluently; and to adapt language structures for purpose. We aim to encourage all pupils to develop foreign language skills – to support learning at Key Stage 3 and to broaden their future career options.
  • Experiences – Foreign Language learning will be celebrated across the school through themed days, including Languages Day and Bastille Day. During the summer term, pupils in Years 5 and 6 will have the opportunity to experience a day in the life of a French student, learning about culture, history and art, and how their language and culture has influenced our own.

Subject Leader : Georgina Tait

Intent

It is our intent for Geography to inspire pupils with a curiosity about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching will equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.

We want our pupils to gain confidence and practical experiences of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills that explain how the Earth’s features, at different scales, are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

We want pupils to enjoy and love learning about Geography by gaining knowledge and skills, not just through experiences in the classroom, but also with the use of fieldwork and educational visits.

Our curriculum for Geography is based on the National Curriculum’s Programme of Study and aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places.
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of places in the world (including both political and physical geography); and to increase their knowledge of other cultures.
  • Learn respect and understanding of what it means to be a positive citizen in a diverse, multi-cultural country.
  • Learn graphic skills, including how to use, draw and interpret maps.
  • Understand environmental problems at a local, regional, national and global scale.
  • Explore people’s emotional, cultural and spiritual connections with places; the role of places in their own feelings of identity, sense of place and belonging; and the ways they experience and use places.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – The Geography National Curriculum is planned for and covered in full within the KS2 school curriculum. We make sure that children learn additional skills, knowledge and understanding in accordance with the gaps in learning of the children in our catchment.
  • Language – The promotion and use of an accurate geographical vocabulary is essential for the successful acquisition of knowledge and understanding in geography. This is visible in planning and is displayed in classrooms.
  • 2 Year Cycle – Our curriculum is taught on a two year cycle (cycle 1 and cycle 2) and within phases (Year 3/4 and Year 5/6) some with a Geographical theme.
  • Key Question – Each lesson provides the pupils with the opportunity to investigate and explore a key question which will work towards a ‘mastery project’ therefore consolidating all their learning across the topic.
  • Mastery – Pupils are encouraged to take care and pride in their work and select the format in which they would like to present their learning. On occasions, pupils may well be asked to research geographical aspects of the theme independently. This allows the pupils to have ownership over their curriculum and lead their own learning in geography.
  • Basic skills – High quality English, Maths and ICT skills are taught throughout Geography. They will acquire a variety of other skills, including those of enquiry, problem solving, computing, investigation and how to present conclusions in the most appropriate way. They will collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes. In addition to this, they will investigate the structure and functioning of environments as systems: of weather, climate, hydrology, geology and soils.
  • Experience – We plan regular trips, welcome visitors into school and have involvement in community activity to provide first-hand experiences for the pupils to support and develop their learning. We recognise that to have impact the planned cultural capital must be clearly linked to the statutory geographical knowledge to be acquired. This will provide the opportunity for pupils to better understand geographical knowledge and apply what they already know.

Try some of these links because they are great fun for learning more about Geographical skills…

Google Earth https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en_uk/earth/

Nottingham maps https://www.visit-nottinghamshire.co.uk/plan-a-visit/maps

How to teach mapping skills https://www.getoutwiththekids.co.uk/family-hiking/teaching-kids-map-reading/

Ordnance Survey Map Skills website for kids https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/mapzone/?awc=2495_1569170182_6968cd7abd725fd019dd50089f4eed87

National Geographic for Kids https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/

The above photos were taken on the Y5/6 school trip to Newstead Abbey, the Victorian home of the Webb family. Pupils dressed as children of the estate workers permitted into the ‘big house’ to watch preparations for Christmas. They experienced the wonders of a grand country house with sessions including ‘sugar mice’ making in the Victorian kitchen, Parlour games in the Great Hall, the ‘Magic Lantern’ show and making herb bags below stairs.

Subject Leader : Georgina Tait

Intent

At the Carlton Junior Academy, we aim for a high-quality History curriculum which inspires pupil’s fascination about Britain’s past and that of the wider world.

The History curriculum develops learning through termly units of work, focused on a Humanities topic and results in the acquisition of knowledge and skills, enabling pupils to enquire, research and analyse in a variety of historical contexts.

We provide a broad and balanced curriculum which promotes the development of the whole child. We develop our pupils to have a holistic set of values that prepares them to be responsible citizens for life in the modern world in a diverse and ever-changing community and work place.

Our curriculum for History is based on the National Curriculum’s Programme of Study and aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world which helps to stimulate pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past.
  • Develop an understanding of British history as a chronological narrative, from ancient times to the present day. It focuses on how British people have been influenced by the rest of the world, and how they have made their own influence felt.
  • Have a growing understanding of the essential events and features of the history of the world as a whole, focusing on the earliest civilisations, most powerful empires, and the ways in which humanity has succeeded and failed.
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, learn to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, and develop perspective and judgement.
  • Have the opportunity to study wider historical concepts such as: continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference, and significance.
  • Begin to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time using primary and secondary sources.
  • Are introduced to historical perspectives, by considering contexts such as location, economics, politics, religion, and key points in time.
  • Develop the behaviours pupils need to succeed in the world such as concentration, perseverance, responsibility, respect, imagination, co-operation, the enjoyment of learning and self-improvement.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – The History National Curriculum is planned for and covered in full within the KS2 school curriculum. We make sure that pupils learn additional skills, knowledge and understanding in accordance with the needs of the pupils in our locality.
  • Language – The promotion and use of an accurate and rich historical vocabulary is essential to the successful acquisition of knowledge and understanding in history. This is visible in planning and is displayed in classrooms. Language skills are also developed through reading a variety of historically themed texts in English lessons.
  • 2 Year Cycle – Our curriculum is taught on a two year cycle (cycle 1 and cycle 2) and within phases (Year 3/4 and Year 5/6) some with a historical theme.
  • Key Question – Every lesson begins with a question which will then be investigated and explored throughout the lesson. At the end of the lesson, the question is reviewed to see how they can now answer the question. They will work towards a ‘mastery project’ which will consolidate all their learning across the theme.
  • Mastery – Pupils are encouraged to take care and pride in their work and select the format in which they would like to present their learning. On occasions, pupils may well be asked to research historical aspects of the theme independently. This allows the pupils to have ownership over their curriculum and lead their own learning in history.
  • Basic skills – High quality English (particularly reading), Maths and ICT skills are taught throughout History. Pupils will make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions, and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analysis. They will recognise the importance of evidence when putting forward historical opinions. This also includes thinking about why some people interpret events or facts differently.
  • ExperienceWe plan regular trips, welcome visitors into school and have involvement in community activity to provide first-hand experiences that enhance learning, therefore promoting a deeper understanding and retention in their long-term memory of Historical learning. We recognise the need to build cultural capital so that it clearly links to the statutory historical knowledge to be acquired, thus providing the opportunity for pupils to better understand historical concepts and apply what they already know.

Try some of these links because they are great fun for learning more about different periods in history…

BBC History website for kids http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/forkids/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/

National Geographic History pages for kids https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/category/discover/history/

Woodlands Primary History pages – lots of information for research on different periods in history http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/history/index.html

The British Museum https://www.britishmuseum.org/

National History Museum https://www.nhm.ac.uk/

Subject Leader: Alexandra Kerrison

Intent

We aim to inspire a love and curiosity for music. We build a clear understanding and acceptance of the validity and importance of all types of music and traditions.

This intention will be achieved through listening, performing, evaluating and composing through singing, percussion work and use of ICT. We are committed to ensuring children understand the value and importance of music in the wider community and that it supports key elements of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, which will help foster an understanding of and respect for cultural diversity.

Our curriculum for Music is based on the National Curriculum and aims to ensure that all children:

  • Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
  • Develop an understanding for the history of music.
  • Gain an appreciation and understanding of a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
  • Use and understand staff and other musical notations.

Implementation

  • Curriculum –Music is taught by class teachers supported by Charanga; an interactive scheme based on listening and appraising, creating and exploring music, alongside singing and performing. All children participate in a bi-weekly singing assembly which encourages them to think about the messages being delivered within a song and linking them to values, everyday contexts and their own lives. Many children have a limited experience of music genres and musical artists, so we aim to broaden children’s knowledge and appreciation of a wide range of artists and genres, building cultural capital.
  • Language – The acquisition of technical musical language is essential to understanding music and being able to express different musical components.
  • Other – During the Autumn Term the children participate in the Christmas production, which involves each year group singing and performing to a live audience. Children who attend choir are offered a variety of opportunities to perform within the local community and during assemblies. Children are also offered the opportunity to undertake instrumental tuition from peripatetic music staff. The school ensures it secures opportunities for the children including visiting musicians and musical experiences. We work closely with the feeder secondary school, The Carlton Academy, to secure experiences of musical performance. We take part in the Trust Talent Show, which encourages children to showcase and celebrate their talents. All children who audition for the Trust Talent Show then have the opportunity to perform at the annual family picnic afternoon.

Subject Leader: Lauren Willson

At Carlton Junior Academy, we have a strong emphasis on Art and Design and this is reflected in our eye-catching displays around school.

Intent 

We believe that Art and Design stimulates creativity and imagination which will allow our pupils to blossom. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a special way of understanding and responding to the world. It enables children to communicate what they see, feel and think through the use of colour, texture, form, pattern and different materials and processes. They learn to make informed judgements and aesthetic and practical decisions. They explore ideas and meanings through the work of a wide range of artists. Through learning about the roles and functions of art, they can explore the impact it has had on contemporary life and that of different times and cultures. They learn to take pride in their work, with a sketchbook that they complete throughout their journey at school. They are able to evaluate and build on previous learning and skills as a way to improve and progress in their learning. With a wealth of different media in our curriculum it gives children chance to find their preferred style.

Our curriculum for Art and Design is based on the National Curriculum Programme of Study and aims for the children to: 

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences.
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques.
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design.
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Implementation

Curriculum – The Art and Design Curriculum is planned to complement the themes being taught each term. Each unit of learning focuses on a specific skill or medium in which the children experiment and learn about. This culminates in a final piece of work through which these skills are displayed. This also reflects the mastery approach to learning as the children are taking the knowledge and skills they have learnt within the unit to freely express themselves in their piece, playing to their individual strengths. We focus on a diverse range of artists to reflect our society, which allows children to gain different cultural experiences. All children are given a sketch book when they arrive at school, in which they create a learning journey while they progress through the years. This allows all of their Art and Design work to be collated in one place, creating a progression portfolio which displays the skills and knowledge they have acquired throughout Key Stage 2. This works alongside the Programme of Study’s recommendations.

2 Year Cycle – Our curriculum is taught on a two-year cycle (cycle 1 and cycle 2) and within phases (Year 3/4 and Year 5/6). These are based around the Geography and History curriculum and we link the Art units of learning to this. The children will complete 12 units of learning by the end of their school journey.

Basic skills – Children will learn to master the skills of effective mark-making through; painting, drawing, shading and sketching, colouring, blending, mixing, craft-design and carving.

Links to school context– Our school has 5 core values that we instill in our children. Determination is key within Art and Design as children need to experiment in order to create a successful finished product and this could mean having to redo or improve on their original designs. With every final piece, we expect the children to achieve excellence. Children have a responsibility to respect all of the equipment they use, learning how to handle each medium whilst keeping them in a good condition to produce excellent quality work.

Language – Subject specific vocabulary is key for the children being able to vocalise their opinions on great artists and their artwork. By children exploring the concepts of colour, texture, form and space, pattern, line and shape and tone,  they will be able to articulate their understanding.

Showcase – Every year we take part in The Carlton Academy’s Art Exhibition which allows us to showcase our best work from all the year groups. The children and staff love taking part in this year-on-year. The work they produce then gets displayed within school for everyone to enjoy.

Here are some websites based on Art:

Subject Leader: Lauren Willson

Intent

Acquiring skills and knowledge of Design and Technology helps to prepare children for the developing world. The subject encourages children to become creative problem-solvers, both as individuals and as part of a team. Through the study of Design and Technology, they combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetic, social and environmental issues. Design and Technology helps all children to become perceptive, informed consumers and potential innovators. It assists children to develop a greater awareness and understanding of how everyday products are designed and made and the part they could play in this as adults in respect to future work opportunities.

Our curriculum for Design and Technology is based on the National Curriculum Programme of Study and aims to facilitate children to: 

Design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • Understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical knowledge

  • Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • Understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages].
  • Understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors].
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Implementation

  • Curriculum – The Design and Technology Curriculum is planned to compliment the Themes being taught each term. Each unit of learning follows the model of Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs), Focused Tasks (FTs) and a Design, Make and Evaluate Assignment (DMEA). These allow children to look at existing products before designing and making their own. Focused tasks pinpoint a particular skill/set of skills that are needed in order to complete the final piece of work. This also reflects the Mastery approach to learning as the children are free to use the skills they have acquired to complete their work in whichever way they feel will best meet the criteria while playing to their individual strengths. We also have two units (one in Year 3/4 and one in Year 5/6) that look at particular architects and designers so children have a grasp of what Design and Technology looks like in the real world.
  • 2 Year Cycle – Our curriculum is taught on a two year cycle (Cycle 1 and Cycle 2) and within phases (Year 3/4 and Year 5/6). These are based around the Geography and History curriculum to which we link the Design and Technology units of learning. The children will complete 12 units of learning by the end of their school journey; this includes 1 unit of cooking and nutrition per year.
  • Cross-curricular skills – With a need to focus on STEM subjects as our world becomes so reliant on technology, Design and Technology provides the opportunity to develop a range of skills. In order to design products, the children need to use Art and Design skills to model their ideas. We focus on using computer aided design and ICT software at Year 5/6 which involves applying prior knowledge of Computing skills. Maths is integral to  planning and measuring materials accurately in order to make a working mechanism. Science extends into most units of learning, from exploring electrical circuits, to understanding forces in order to make moving products, as well as understanding the concept of gravity and materials and how this can influence structures and design choices.
  • Links to school context– Our school has 5 core values that we instill in our children. Determination is key within Design and Technology as children need to experiment in order to create a successful finished product and this could mean having to refine or improve their original designs. With every final piece, we expect the children to achieve excellence. We focus on food and nutrition knowledge of healthy lifestyles to support and encourage the reduction of obesity in children. Children have a responsibility to respect all of the equipment they use, learning how to safely and efficiently use different tools and materials whilst keeping them in a good condition for future use.
  • Language – Subject specific vocabulary is key for the children to effectively express their opinions about existing products and how they have been designed and made. The accurate use of technical vocabulary also supports children in working collaboratively to discuss the intricacies of design.

Here are some websites based around Design and Technology:

Subject Leader : Kylie Daly

At The Carlton Junior Academy, we follow Jigsaw PSHE, which connects the pieces of Personal, Social and Health Education, emotional literacy, social skills and spiritual development. We aim to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes our children need to keep themselves healthy and safe and help them to prepare for life and work in modern Britain.

SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural) development opportunities are mapped throughout. All of these pieces of learning are brought together to form a cohesive picture, helping children to know and value who they are and understand how they relate to other people in the world.

Personal, Social and Health education (PSHE) and Relationships (RE)

Intent:

At the Carlton Junior Academy, our PSHE and relationship (RE) curriculum actively promotes all our children to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society. It aims to help them to reflect on how they are developing personally and socially, and tackles many of the moral, social, spiritual and cultural issues that are part of growing up in Carlton. We provide our children with opportunities for them to learn about rights and responsibilities and appreciate what it means to be a member of a diverse society in Britain and the wider world. Our children are encouraged to develop their sense of self-worth by playing a positive role in contributing to school life and the wider community.

Our PSHE and Relationships Education is based on the National Curriculum with an overarching aim to provide pupils with:

  • Accurate and relevant knowledge.
  • Opportunities to turn that knowledge into personal understanding.
  • Opportunities to explore, clarify and if necessary challenge, their own and others’ values, attitudes, beliefs, rights and responsibilities.
  • The skills and strategies they need in order to live healthy, safe, fulfilling, responsible and balanced lives.

Implementation:

As an Academy, we have chosen after extensive research and recommendations from other schools in the county to deliver our PSHE curriculum through use of a scheme called ‘Jigsaw – the mindful approach to PSHE’.

We deliver the PSHE and RE curriculum where possible through first-hand experience and sharing good practice and it is every staff member’s responsibility to do this by being a role model and having high expectations of themselves and our pupils.

All staff actively promote, ‘our values’ and develop these with the children.

Curriculum

We have drawn on guidance from the PSHE Association and the 2019 Draft Guidance for Statutory Relationships and Health Education in revising our curriculum Framework for PSHE to ensure that it meets the needs of our pupils in today’s changing society.

Jigsaw has two aims for all children:

  • To build their capacity for learning
  • To equip them for life

Jigsaw brings together PSHE Education, emotional literacy, mindfulness, social skills and spiritual development. A variety of teaching strategies are used and are mindful of each child’s preferred learning style. Jigsaw is designed as a whole-school approach, with all year groups working on the same theme (Puzzle) at the same time. This enables each Puzzle to start with an introductory assembly, generating a whole school focus for adults and children alike. There is a Weekly Celebration that highlights a theme from that week’s lesson across the school, and encourages children to reflect that learning in their behaviour and attitudes.

The curriculum reflect the needs of our pupils and is tailored to meet the local context. We expect teachers to use the PSHE programme to equip pupils with a sound understanding of risk and with the knowledge and skills necessary to make safe and informed decisions.

The curriculum is split into three core themes of:  Health and Well-being; Relationships; and Living in the Wider World. There are six Puzzles (half-term units of work) each with six Pieces (lessons). Every year group studies the same Puzzle at the same time (sequentially ordered from September to July), allowing for whole-school themes and the end of Puzzle product, for example, a display or exhibition (like the Garden of Dreams and Goals) to be shared and celebrated by the whole school. Each year group is taught one lesson per week and all lessons are delivered in an age and stage appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs.

The Puzzles and What Children Learn:

‘Being Me In My World’ covers a wide range of topics, including a sense of belonging, welcoming others and being part of a school community, a wider community, and a global community. It also looks at children’s rights and responsibilities, working and socialising with others, and pupil voice.

‘Celebrating Difference’ focuses on similarities and differences and teaches about diversity, such as disability, racism, power, friendships, and conflict. Children learn to accept everyone’s right to ‘difference’, and most year groups explore the concept of ‘normal’. Bullying – what it is and what it isn’t, including cyber and homophobic bullying – is an important aspect of this Puzzle.

‘Dreams and Goals’ aims to help children think about their hopes and dreams, their goals for success, what personal strengths are, and how to overcome challenges, via team work skills and tasks. There is also a focus on enterprise and fundraising. Children learn about experiencing and managing feelings of pride, ambition, disappointment and success. They also get to share their aspirations, the dreams and goals of others in different cultures/countries, and their dreams for the world.

‘Healthy Me’ covers two main areas of health: Emotional health (relaxation, being safe, friendships, mental health skills, body image, relationships with food, managing stress) and Physical health (eating a balanced diet, physical activity, rest and relaxation, keeping clean, drugs and alcohol, being safe, first aid) in order for children to learn that health is a very broad topic.

‘Relationships’ has a wide focus, looking at diverse topics such as families, friendships, pets and animals, and love and loss. A vital part of this Puzzle is about safeguarding and keeping children safe. This links to cyber safety and social networking, as well as attraction and assertiveness. Children learn how to deal with conflict, their own strengths and self-esteem. They have the chance to explore roles and responsibilities in families, and look at stereotypes. All Jigsaw lessons are delivered in an age and stage appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs.

‘Changing Me’ deals with change of many types, from growing from young to old, becoming a teenager, assertiveness, self-respect and safeguarding. Self and body image, puberty, attraction and accepting change are diverse subjects for children to explore. Each year group thinks about looking ahead, moving year groups or the transition to secondary school. Life cycles and how babies are made and grow are treated sensitively and are designed to meet children’s needs. All year groups learn about how people and bodies change. This Puzzle links with the Science curriculum when teaching children about life cycles, babies and puberty.

The whole-school PSHE scheme of work includes units on British Values, Global Citizenship, Personal Safety, Health, RSE and Mental Well-being. Links are made to termly themes and other curriculum subjects where appropriate, for example, healthy lifestyles through P.E and ‘Mother Nature’s Plate’ and environmental issues through ‘Into the Blue’.

Cultural capital is at the heart of every Jigsaw PSHE lesson helping students to understand and navigate a rapidly changing 21st Century world. Citizenship, at school, community, national and global levels are integral to the programme.

Through the programme of study, the children will have a good balance of these overarching concepts:

  • Identity
  • Relationships
  • A healthy, balanced lifestyle
  • Identification of risk and safety
  • Diversity and equality
  • Rights, responsibilities and consent
  • Change and resilience
  • Power
  • Career

Context

Beyond the planned programme for PSHE education, the curriculum provides children with a variety of experiences to support their context, which have the potential to promote their personal, social development and economic education.

These include:

  • Assemblies of Celebration and acts of Collective Worship
  • Circle time
  • Sports clubs and participating in inter-school and county tournaments and competitions
  • Drama and music activities and productions
  • Residential visits and day trips
  • Clubs – singing, drama and sports
  • Charity and fund raising events, for example Children in Need, Comic Relief, MacMillan Coffee and Cake, Sports Relief, Christmas Jumper, WE Charity
  • Theme days/events, for example Anti-Bullying Week, Show Racism the Red Card, NSPCC workshops, Bike Safety, Road Safety, Safer Internet Day and Healthy Eating Week
  • Linking schools Project
  • Transition opportunities, visiting the local secondary school
  • Leadership opportunities, for example Playground Peacemakers, Young  Leaders, representatives on our Children’s Council (The Carlton Cabinet)
  • Pledge system, to encouraged children to gain a breadth of experiences both in and out of school life
  • Bespoke support, for example managing emotions, circle of friends, co-operation skills

The children use learning journey journals to record their responses in a more reflective/personal way. These books travel with the children as they move to the next year group so they can look back at their learning and the next teacher can see the starting points.

PSHE and British Values are all addressed as part of school assemblies and collective worship where children’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural curiosity is stimulated, challenged and nurtured.

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development

PSHE education gives children specific opportunities to explore the range of attitudes and values in society, and to consider the kind of society they want to live in. Through exploration and discussion of topical political, spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues they develop skills and attitudes that promote:

  • Empathy and a willingness to perceive and understand the interests, beliefs and viewpoints of others.
  • A willingness and ability to apply reasoning skills to problems and to value a respect for truth and evidence in forming or holding opinions.
  • A willingness and ability to participate in decision-making, to value freedom, to choose between alternatives and to value fairness as a basis for making and judging decisions.

PSHE education promotes:

Spiritual development, through fostering children’s awareness and understanding of issues that involve differing beliefs and values in human society. It helps children develop self-knowledge through an exploration of their identity and belonging, their ideals and commitment and the meaning or purpose they see in life.

Moral development, through helping children to acquire a critical appreciation of issues of right and wrong, justice, fairness, rights and obligations in society. Children have opportunities to explore the ethical and moral dimensions of legal, political, social, economic and environmental issues and to exercise responsibility at a personal and social level.

Social development, through helping children to acquire the understanding and skills they need to become responsible and effective members of society. They develop an understanding of how society works and how decisions are influenced and made. They take part in community and social activities that help to promote personal and social skills.

Cultural development, through helping children to understand the nature and role of the different groups to which they belong, to learn about the origins and implications of the diversity in society, and to develop respect for difference.

Opportunities to reflect on spiritual, moral, social and cultural dimensions occur through many aspects of PSHE education. Children are encouraged to consider their own views and opinions about them, for example, as they investigate and think about global and topical issues, problems and events, and as they participate in activities in school, in their neighbourhood and communities.

The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness. Mindfulness is being able to observe your own thoughts and feelings as they happen, in the present moment, applying no judgement. Jigsaw teaches children to understand their thoughts and feelings and through both taught lessons and the Calm Me time exercises (using the Jigsaw chime), helping to develop their awareness, and their capacity to be mindful human beings. Learning is thus enhanced as emotions are regulated, behaviour managed and calmness generated.

PSHE Resources

10 Leaflet For Parents And Carers

11b British Values In Jigsaw By Puzzle And Year Group

Detailed Guide For Parents And Carers On Jigsaw Sre

Year 3 Overviews

Year 4 Overviews

Year 5 Overviews

Year 6 Overviews

UK Jigsaw PSHE Policy

Jigsaw Intro For Children

Subject Leader: Cassie de Gilbert

Intent

In a world that is rich in diversity, we feel it is vital to expose our children to the varied belief systems around them. It is crucial for all our pupils to learn about major world religions, in order to grow into respectful, well-informed citizens of the world with well-developed social, moral, cultural and spiritual understanding. Following on from this, children will consider how religious and moral teachings can be applied to their own lives. We look to ensure our Religious Education curriculum is brought to life with real experiences of places of worship and interactions with believers in our local area.

Our curriculum for Religious Education follows the syllabus for Religious Education for Nottinghamshire, which contributes dynamically to children and young people’s education in schools, provoking challenging questions about human life, beliefs, communities and ideas. It aims to ensure that all children:

  • Learn from religions and world views about different ways of life in local, national and global contexts.
  • Discover, explore and consider many different answers to questions about human identity, meaning and value.
  • Learn to weigh up for themselves the value of wisdom from different communities, to disagree respectfully, to be reasonable in their responses to religions and world views and to respond by expressing insights into their own and others’ lives.
  • Think rigorously, creatively, imaginatively and respectfully about their ideas in relation to religions and world views.
  • Develop the ability to engage with ideas about British values, such as tolerance and respect for people who hold varied beliefs and world views.

Implementation

Through half-termly units of learning, pupils will study a minimum of three religions throughout Key Stage 2:

  • Curriculum:
     The syllabus is covered through half-termly units of work which enable pupils to explore a religion, learn from it and apply skills to a different forum. It begins with an introduction to the topic which explores children’s initial understanding of key vocabulary. Following this, a cycle of lessons are carefully planned for progression and depth. An ‘end point’ task is then undertaken which allows pupils to apply their understanding to an independent task.
  • Mastery:
     At the end of each topic, pupils will undertake a project which allows them to draw upon learning from religion/s they have studied and discussions they have had with their peers. This will allow them to take care to present their work in a way which consolidates their understanding and promotes securing knowledge in long term memory.
  • Experiences:
    Each year, all children visit our local church, St Paul’s, and take part in faith experiences (including but not limited to, Pentecost, Easter and Christmas). In Year 3 and 4, pupils visit the local mandir as part of their learning and Year 5 and 6, visit a mosque and a synagogue. This allows them to deepen their understanding of major world religions.
  • Language:
    Through the exploration of different religions and cultures, pupils are exposed to a wide range of subject specific vocabulary. They are encouraged to use this when formulating their own ideas or asking questions about moral concepts.
  • Basic Skills:
    Within Religious Education, debate and enquiry are key. Pupils have regular opportunities to develop their oracy skills through classroom discussions where they share their own views and respectfully evaluate the views of others.
  • Link to school’s context:
    Our school community comprises of an increasing number of children from a range of religions including: Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Sikhism. Our RE curriculum allows pupils to deepen their understanding of the diversity of the world in which they live and in turn, learn how to be global citizens. Our school values are clearly evident in each session, with pupils: being respectful of one another, developing relationships with their peers (and with the world around them), considering how religious and non-religious people are role models of excellence and take responsibility for their own actions.
  • Other:
    We undertake Collective Worship daily – focusing on a weekly theme which relates to current events. These sessions occur in many forms either in whole school sessions, in class sessions or sessions run in small groups. Collective Worship can be activities such as: singing, reflection, meditation and discussion.

RE Policy 2020

In June 2020, all schools and academies in England will be required to administer an online Multiplication Tables Check (MTC) to Year 4 pupils.

The National Curriculum specifies that pupils should be taught to recall the multiplication tables up to and including 12 × 12 by the end of Year 4.

The check consists of 25 questions and pupils have 6 seconds to enter a response to the question. Once the question is answered, there will be a 3 second pause before the next question appears.

The purpose of the MTC is to determine whether pupils can recall their multiplication tables quickly and fluently, which is essential for future success in mathematics. It will help schools to identify pupils who have not yet mastered their multiplication tables, so that additional support can be provided.

An information leaflet for parents

https://matr.org/blog/times-tables-test-parents-guide/ (A useful guide to explain the Multiplication Tables Check.)

https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/477/Multiplication-Tables-Check (This is a great website that exactly mirrors the ‘Multiplication Tables Check’ that will be given to children at the end of Year 4)

https://ttrockstars.com/login (Your child’s login should be in their organisers. Don’t hesitate to contact us if there is a problem about this)

IXL (On this website there is list of all of the skills that cover multiplication! These skills are organised by year)

www.multiplication.com (This has lots of fun games based on multiplication as well as addition and subtraction)

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/7-11-years/times-tables (On this website there are different times tables games for your child to try)

https://www.timestables.co.uk/ (A good step by step approach to improving times tables knowledge)

http://www.learnyourtables.co.uk/en/index2.htm (A hands on approach to learn tables)

SATs Information for Parents

As we approach our SATs in May 2020, we would like to share some information with you.

If you have a child in Year 6, they will take National Curriculum tests in English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling, English Reading and Mathematics. The tests help measure the progress pupils have made and identify if they need additional support in a certain area. The tests are also used to assess schools’ performance and to produce national performance data.

At the end of the summer term you should receive test results for:
• English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling
• English Reading
• Mathematics

Teacher Assessment
As there is no test for English Writing, this will be reported as a teacher assessment judgement. This is a judgement teachers will make, based on your child’s work at the end of Key Stage 2. You will also receive a teacher assessment judgement for Science.

SATs week will occur on the following dates:

Day AM PM
Monday 11th May 2020 Grammar Spelling
Tuesday 12th May 2020 Reading Test
Wednesday 13th May 2020 Maths: Paper 1 Maths: Paper 2
Thursday 14th May 2020 Maths: Paper 3

 

What happens if you child is ill during SATs week?

  • Please ring into school as soon as possible.
  • Keep your child separate from their peers and away from social media.
  • School has up to 5 days to take the test they have missed

Here are some helpful websites for your children to access (to aid with revision):

www.spag.com

https://ttrockstars.com/

https://www.spellingshed.com/

Logins for these websites should already be in your child’s organiser.

 

IXL have separate pages of skills linked to individual Year Groups.  The Y6 page has links to practise both English and Maths skills.  Pages are then split into skills with a practise question for the children to think about.

https://uk.ixl.com/promo?partner=google&campaign=1187&adGroup=Key+Stage+2&gclid=CPPa8teS_8kCFQbnwgodgOIB6A

 

BBC Education have produced a whole host of materials for KS2.  Follow the KS2 link and then select either Maths or English.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education

 

A site with both Maths and English based quizzes which are marked as you go along.

http://www.educationquizzes.com/ks2/maths/

 

A site with a range of information and questions – great for revision purposes!

http://www.icteachers.co.uk/children/children_sats.htm

Loads of Maths games on a range of Mathematical concepts.

https://www.sheppardsoftware.com/math.htm

 

A range of English games and activities.

http://www.crickweb.co.uk/ks2literacy.html

 

Activities to reinforce and practise a range of spelling rules.

http://www.keystage2literacy.co.uk/spellings-menu.html

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